Best Treatment For Alcohol Use Disorder

Alcohol Addiction Treatment Options

Essentially, Alcohol Use Disorder treatment provides alcoholics with the tools they need to combat their disease. It’s up to them, once the defenses have been built, to massage their willpower and keep to the given path. Yet, when it comes to treatment metrics, it’s important to count success in increments. Simply deciding on a treatment plan is paramount for the alcoholic, as they have admitted there’s a problem. Even if treatment keeps an alcoholic away from substance abuse for a month, that’s a success. Treatment programs work—but it’s not a cure, it’s a lifestyle that must become law to the AUD sufferer.

Behavioral Therapy

Therapy, regarding alcohol use disorder treatment, was implemented in the 1980s, driving forward a new standard of treatment rooted in common practices today. What we are referring to here is behavioral therapy. The thesis is brilliantly simple; while healthcare professionals can target the addiction, often what led to the ailment comes from life factors outside of AUD.

Behavioral therapy works to identify areas in which the person(s) did not experience proper development, encouraging them to become self-aware in ways they were not originally. It creates the foundation for lifestyle changes and encourages them to set goals, monitor progress, an analyze the root of drinking patterns.

This then allows the sufferer to gain coping tools, improve their communication, and understand their reactionary tendencies. Essentially, treatment works to identify the symptoms of AUD and therapy asks the question: outside of dependency, why do you feel that need to drink? For what reason is alcohol a solution? Once these questions are answered, the AUD sufferer can than use other solutions to fill these voids, or cope, which then becomes part of their alcoholism treatment methods. It’s not just about treating the disease, it’s treating the person as a whole.

Therapy helps:

  • Identify Root Problems
  • Establish Coping Mechanisms
  • Treat the Person and the Condition
  • Create Tools That Assist in All Facets of Life
  • Establish Self-Awareness
  • Set Future Goals
  • Create A Self-Monitoring System

Types of Alcohol Addiction Therapy

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on the modification of dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts by exposing negative or irrational beliefs that commonly accompany an addicted person’s justification for the maladaptive behaviors associated with drug and alcohol addiction.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provides therapeutic skills in four key areas: Mindfullness Distress Emotion Regulation Interpersonal Effectiveness Though this treatment modality was first developed to treat Borderline Personality Disorder it is also used to treat: addiction, PTSD, and more…

Motivational Interviewing (MI)

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is generally utilized as a short term therapeutic intervention and is one of the most common evidenced based approaches used to evoke change. The clinician encourages patients to discuss their need for change and reasons for change and the clinician then reflects back the patient’s reasoning and motivation for change.

EMDR Trauma Therapy

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a nontraditional therapy—like CBT, DBT, etc.—that uses a patient’s own rapid, rhythmic eye movements to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorders, eating disorders, addictions, and anxiety with the primary goal being to weaken the negative emotions associated with disturbing memories that might otherwise create a debilitating response.

Somatic Experience (SE)

Somatic Experience (SE) is among the newest evidenced based approaches for treating PTSD and other trauma related disorders. SE focuses on the restoring of the central nervous system back to equilibrium to give the individual a greater sense of safety. The idea being that someone suffering from PTSD and trauma will experience sustained healing when the nervous system regains equilibrium.

Relapse Prevention Therapy (RPT)

Relapse Prevention Therapy (RPT) is a common cognitive behavioral therapy approach that is designed to teach individuals who are trying to maintain changes in their behavior how to anticipate and cope with the problem of relapse. As the saying goes, the relapse happens prior to the actual use of drugs or alcohol. RPT seeks to address the reality of the relapse before it happens.occurring disorders.

12 Step Approach

Peaks Recovery is a 12 Step informed treatment center and understands the value it brings to integrate the 12 Step Approach into the recovery process. These well known principles can help build a foundation for long term success.

Holistic & Wellness Therapy

An holistic approach takes a stance in an individual’s personal needs, strengths, beliefs and preferences. This approach allows oneself to positively change the way they view themselves in the world, which in return empowers one to grab better hold of the struggles of addiction. Some holistic therapies might include yoga, meditation, fitness, creative expression, or acupuncture.

Group & Individual Therapy

Integrating both individual and group therapy sessions will help develop a wide range of healing. Peaks’ offers intimate group services delivered by the patient’s primary therapist. This supports faster rapport building between the patient, the patient’s peers, and their therapist while also giving your loved one’s therapist greater insights into the patient’s addiction and/ or co-occurring disorders.before it happens.

An Ongoing Process

Relapse Is Part Of The Process

Persistence is key. While speaking on relapse can be difficult, it is paramount in regards to recovery. Statistically, when an AUD sufferer attempts to break their chains, they have a higher likelihood of relapse than not. Similar to smoking, it often takes several attempts before a patient can manage their AUD, then continue on the route of sobriety afterward.

If you happen to be reading this because you tried quitting cold turkey—and you relapsed—then rest assured that this is not an end-all, nor is it indicative of your capacity for recovery. It is merely a part of the process—another hurdle you must overcome in order to find long-term treatment.

Thus, we encourage you to identify your needs, speak to a professional, and research alternate methods that may compliment you perfectly. We commend you for your courage and want to reiterate, as we hope you know, you are not alone. You will beat this. The best treatment plan for alcohol use disorder is a question you and you alone must answer. We are simply here to guide you to the best option for your individual case.

Man drinking alcohol

Medications For Alcohol Withdrawal

In a medically assisted detox, there are a few medications that are used to help the individual withdrawal symptoms become less severe and more tolerable. Some of these medications could include:

ANXIOLYTICS – These can promote the relief of stress and anxiety, and also allow the individual to sleep.

SEDATIVES – Sedatives to dull senses, create a sense of calmness, and allows them to sleep. Most of the time FDA approved Benzodiazepines are used.

ANTABUSE & VIVITROL – Antabuse makes one sick if the ingest alcohol, and Vivitrol removes the ‘reward’ sensation from alcohol.

CAMPRAL – Mitigates cravings

Man with mental health

Does Alcohol Treatment Work?

When it comes to the efficacy of AUD treatment, it’s astounding. While there is no cure for alcoholism—given that any alcoholic will tell you it’s a lifelong struggle—treatment can, at a minimum, mitigate problems brought on by AUD. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism explains that “one-third of people who are treated for alcohol problems have no further symptoms one year later. Many others substantially reduce their drinking and report fewer alcohol-related problems.’

Essentially, AUD treatment provides alcoholics with the tools they need to combat their disease. It’s up to them, once the defenses have been built, to massage their willpower and keep to the given path. Yet, when it comes to treatment metrics, it’s important to count success in increments. Simply deciding on a treatment plan is paramount for the alcoholic, as they have admitted there’s a problem. Even if treatment keeps an alcoholic away from substance abuse for a month, that’s a success. Treatment programs work—but it’s not a cure, it’s a lifestyle that must become law to the AUD sufferer.

If you happen to be reading this because you tried quitting cold turkey—and you relapsed—then rest assured that this is not an end-all, nor is it indicative of your capacity for recovery. It is merely a part of the process—another hurdle you must overcome in order to find long term treatment.

Thus, we encourage you to identify your needs, speak to a professional, and research alternate methods that may compliment you perfectly. We commend you for your courage and want to reiterate, as we hope you know, you are not alone. You will beat this.

The best treatment plan for alcohol use disorder is a question you and you alone must answer. We are simply here to guide you to the best option for your individual case.

What To Look For In An Alcohol Rehab

We know the decision in choosing the correct treatment center is an important one. Once you have determined the level of care you or your loved one needs, there are a few factors to consider before making the final decision. With each individual and circumstances varying, consider some of the following:

Gender Specific
Dual Diagnosis
Culture & Values
Therapy Types
Accreditation
Location
Budget & Insurance
Holistic Approaches

Find The Best Treatment For You

The issue with AUD is that it takes many forms. There is no single miracle pill that can cure the disease outright. It is often a co-occurring disorder, mixed with either mental illness or a place in which the patient is lacking. Thus, the best alcohol use disorder treatment that cured and changed the life of a given patient may not have the same effect on you.

It is paramount that you address your circumstances, needs, and the goals you have for yourself before choosing a treatment method. We will talk on some of the obvious limitations but ultimately, no matter what you do, treating your alcohol dependence should be your number one priority. The rest of your life can wait, as the rest of your life could be tainted by the issues you are currently facing.

Here are some important questions to ask yourself before choosing a treatment mode for your substance abuse:

  • Do you have health insurance? If so, what sort of treatment can you realistically afford? Is there anyone that can help you fund the endeavor?
  • What is the severity of your condition? What is your current alcohol intake?
  • Do you think, if left in your environment, that you would be able to handle triggers?
  • If you have tried to kick your addiction in the past, what worked? What didn’t?
  • What are your primary goals in treating AUD?
  • Are these goals attainable given a specific type of alcohol use disorder treatment?

The reality is that everyone values sobriety. If you have forces (people) in your life that react negatively to your goals (an example would be an employer not keen on the idea of you gone in rehab for 30 days), then they should no longer be a part of your life. Overcoming AUD and obtaining a skill set which helps you cope in your everyday life is not an easy task. If it were, sufferers across the world would have an easier time righting their disease. As it stands, alcoholism is merciless, powerful, and difficult to control.

What you are doing takes courage and we commend you for it. That is why it is important you know that there is a treatment that complements you, your circumstances, and the goals you wish to achieve. Research alternative or traditional methods, then reach out to a professional for advice—at the very least, someone will provide information to point you in the right direction.

Alcohol Addiction Services

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